Copywriting

Why should I hire you as a copywriter?

I've been asked that question at least twice a year since 2004, when I first walked the line between un- and self-employment. My first thought is that too many people create too many things using "lorem ipsum" as their guide. Maybe you've followed this exact thread of logic: get swept up in the look without giving much thought to the voice, then wind up slapping something horrible over what had been a nice design, and taking the whole thing from an A+ to a B-.

Am I right?

For lots of folks, words are an afterthought. In my opinion, copy should flow like water. First, at the highest point, when we're talking words, we're really talking about content strategy and UX. Actually, let's take it a step HIGHER. At the very highest point, we're talking BRAND VOICE and IDENTITY. Then we get into content and UX. And THEN, in web land at least, we get into the naked truth of copy.

What is copy? It's the sum of the various parts of your brand that must point back to the origin (identity) and flow out in a voice that prompts others to make decisions.

Copy should:

  • Speak FROM the brand
  • Speak FOR the brand
  • Give others a reason to care
  • Be as engaging as possible
  • Prompt action

Copy should not:

  • Take itself too seriously
  • Try to do all the work
  • Ignore its role in the greater content strategy and UX scheme

Here's another question I hear: "Can you bang out (this much) copy so we can launch (this thing) in (this amount of time)?" My answer is, "Sure, no problem." Reason being, writing copy is simple as long as you're paying attention.

What is copy? It's the sum of the various parts of your brand that must point back to the origin (identity) and flow out in a voice that prompts others to make decisions.

My best advice if you're going it alone: write like you talk, and don't try to do too much. The words have to dance with the design, or else no one is going to care about either.

Do you care about your copy? I hope you do.
​Here's another question I hear: "Can you bang out (this much) copy so we can launch (this thing) in (this amount of time)?" My answer is, "Sure, no problem." Reason being, writing copy is simple as long as you're paying attention.